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Limestone College Archives

Limestone College History:

When Limestone College was established in 1845, it was the first women's college in South Carolina and one of the first in the United States. Founders Dr. Thomas Curtis and son, Dr. William Curtis, distinguished scholars from England, sought to provide educational opportunities to those who had not otherwise had them. In the late 1960s, Limestone became fully coeducational.

Limestone's campus is a unique landscape of history and progress.

Limestone College Historical Marker: “Founded in 1845 as the Limestone Springs Female High School by Dr. Thomas Curtis and his son Dr. William Curtis, distinguished Baptist clergymen. The school thrived until falling on hard times during the Civil War and Reconstruction. In 1881 the institution was revived by New York benefactor Peter Cooper as Cooper-Limestone Institute. Renamed Limestone College in 1898.”

Nine buildings on the main campus are included on the National Register of Historic Places plus Nesbitt's Quarry and Limestone Springs Baptist Church (previously owned by the College). All nine buildings have undergone major renovations. Although these historic buildings offer a picture of Limestone's past, they also house the modern technology necessary to make Limestone a liberal arts college with a view of the future.

Limestone College is an accredited, independent, coeducational, four-year liberal arts institution chartered by the state of South Carolina. Our programs lead to a Master of Business Administration, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Social Work, Associate of Arts, or Associate of Science degree.

A History of Limestone College: 1845-1970

Cover of A History of Limestone CollegeA History of Limestone College: 1845-1970

By Dr. Montague McMillan, LD3071 .L622 M283, 1970

Read the digital version of the book:

If you are experiencing problems with our guides, please contact Janet S. Ward, jward@limestone.edu, Associate Professor and Web Services Librarian.